A very close friend is visiting from Madrid and at her party, I was in charge of entertaining her Spanish-speaking guests.

It was totally awesome to hear myself speak español again. More so, I’m glad to have made new friends from Spain and Ecuador. The general consensus was that my Colombian accent was perfect and quite pleasing to the ear! (No joda, marica.)

They were also impressed that I had a decent array of regional accents in my arsenal. It’s highly likely that I’ll pick up the Madrileño one if and when I do decide to live there. So, like, chevere.gif

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accents spanish stuff

So apparently Luis Carlos Velez is the first Latin American to crossover from CNN en Español to CNN International. I’m happy for the promotion, but I find his accent — he’s Colombian — too thick that sometimes it’s unintelligible.
I lived in Colombia so I’m used to hearing people talk like that (“eembestors,” “berry berry gooood,” “let’s go to the bitch, “etc). I’m not too sure if an English-language cable news network is the right place for it though. Research at the University of Chicago shows that “a foreign accent undermines a person’s credibility in ways that the speaker and the listener don’t consciously realize.”

So apparently Luis Carlos Velez is the first Latin American to crossover from CNN en Español to CNN International. I’m happy for the promotion, but I find his accent — he’s Colombian — too thick that sometimes it’s unintelligible.

I lived in Colombia so I’m used to hearing people talk like that (“eembestors,” “berry berry gooood,” “let’s go to the bitch, “etc). I’m not too sure if an English-language cable news network is the right place for it though. Research at the University of Chicago shows that “a foreign accent undermines a person’s credibility in ways that the speaker and the listener don’t consciously realize.”

Luis Carlos Velez accents credibility is science racist?

Just saw My Fair Lady and instead of being bored/annoyed by all the singing, I actually enjoyed it. For something that came out in 1964, it’s still a relevant commentary on class consciousness and sociolinguistics.
Having spent my entire life in private school, I related the most to Professor Henry Higgins’ character. (I went through 18 or so years of being taught that there is an “us” and   there is a “them,” which is why I’m sort of obsessed with the US  public  school system. I often wonder what it’s like anthropologically.  But I  digress.) He’s a bit of a snob and a jerk, and his douchiness is more left-brained than emotional.  Not an excuse, but still. 
Americans, used to meritocracy, will never understand how society can  base its treatment of a person purely on his or her accent, as this  notion of class is more prevalent in Europe. On the other hand, social  mobility — “upwardly mobile self-transformation,” as Adam Haslett put it — is a lot more  difficult in the UK than it is in the US.(More in this FT article, “The class ceiling”.)
I find it both appalling and fascinating that I somehow have the ability to tell where you’re from based on your accent. (There was even a time when I was able to detect which private school you attended — or didn’t — based on your speech. I also have the gift, if you could call if that, of determining which part of London (or England, for that matter) you reside. Same goes for Spanish: I can differentiate a Peruvian, Venezuelan or Colombian lilt from an Argentinian, Cuban or Mexican one. I’ve always found it easy.) Now I’m trying to figure out how to turn this into a lucrative career!
PS: And if I still seem uptight, how I am on Tumblr is already me being not uptight. You should meet some of my friends (or my uncles)!

Just saw My Fair Lady and instead of being bored/annoyed by all the singing, I actually enjoyed it. For something that came out in 1964, it’s still a relevant commentary on class consciousness and sociolinguistics.

Having spent my entire life in private school, I related the most to Professor Henry Higgins’ character. (I went through 18 or so years of being taught that there is an “us” and there is a “them,” which is why I’m sort of obsessed with the US public school system. I often wonder what it’s like anthropologically. But I digress.) He’s a bit of a snob and a jerk, and his douchiness is more left-brained than emotional.  Not an excuse, but still. 

Americans, used to meritocracy, will never understand how society can base its treatment of a person purely on his or her accent, as this notion of class is more prevalent in Europe. On the other hand, social mobility — “upwardly mobile self-transformation,” as Adam Haslett put it — is a lot more difficult in the UK than it is in the US.(More in this FT article, “The class ceiling”.)

I find it both appalling and fascinating that I somehow have the ability to tell where you’re from based on your accent. (There was even a time when I was able to detect which private school you attended — or didn’t — based on your speech. I also have the gift, if you could call if that, of determining which part of London (or England, for that matter) you reside. Same goes for Spanish: I can differentiate a Peruvian, Venezuelan or Colombian lilt from an Argentinian, Cuban or Mexican one. I’ve always found it easy.) Now I’m trying to figure out how to turn this into a lucrative career!

PS: And if I still seem uptight, how I am on Tumblr is already me being not uptight. You should meet some of my friends (or my uncles)!

my fair lady accents sociolinguistics